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The Interview Method

Structured Interview

❶Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology , 7 1 , pp. Structured interviews are conducted in various modes:

Unstructured Interview

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Or how they think they feel and behave. Interviews can give us both quantitative and qualitative data about participants' thoughts, feelings and behaviours. The more structured or standardised interview questions are, the more able you are to get quantitative data. Quantitative data is reliable and easy to analyse.

The less structured and freer ranging the interview questions the more qualitative your data becomes. Qualitative data is difficult to analyse and is not as reliable. There are two categories of interview, the structured interview and unstructured interview.

The key feature of the structured interview is in the pre-planning of all the questions asked. Structured interviews also allow for replication of the interview with others. You can then generalise what you find out to the population from which your interview sample came. Structured interviews are conducted in various modes: There are three types of structured interview. The structured interview itself, the semi-structured interview and the clinical interview.

A major feature, and difference, is the degree to which each use standardised and unplanned questions. Standardisation helps the reliability of your results and conclusions. The more use of unplanned questions, the less structured the interview becomes. Unplanned spontaneous questions are a key feature of the unstructured interview. Spontaneous questioning is more responsive to the paricipant. However spontaneous questioning does not allow for generalisation.

Spontaneous questions can also be accused of generating invalid results and conclusions. Compare the types of interview, at a glance. Standardisation of all questions can give quantifiable data.

Instead you will be asked how you did handle a specific situation when you encountered it in the past. Keep in mind that employers are not interested in what you should have done, or what you will do next time Behavioral interview questions generally start with any one of the following phrases:. This type of question requires you to tell stories from your past. These stories will be evaluated for evidence of your intellectual competence, leadership, teamwork, personal skills, adjustment and flexibility, motivation, communication skills, administrative skills, and technical abilities.

To prepare for a behavioral interview, you must first identify the skills and strengths that the employer is seeking. Next, reflect on your past experiences educational, employment, extra-curricular, personal in order to identify situations in which you clearly demonstrated the identified skills. During the interview, you must be able to recount these circumstances articulately and in a manner which showcases your strengths.

A thorough answer should describe the S ituation, the T asks with which you were charged, the A ction you took, and the R esult of your action. Employers utilize this style of questioning to test a candidate's analytical ability and communication skills. In a problem solving or case interview, you will be presented with a real or simulated problem to consider and solve. You are not necessarily expected to arrive at the "correct answer.

An effective answer is one which demonstrates your ability to break a problem down into manageable pieces and to think clearly under pressure.

Employers often like to gather the opinions of several members of their staff prior to deciding which candidate to hire. To accomplish this, panel interviews are often used where one candidate may be interviewed by a few people at once. When giving your answers, focus on the person who asked you the question, but make eye contact with the other members in the group from time to time.

Panel interviews can vary in style and tone, but generally they will be more formal and include behavioral based questions. While some information can be elicited once you have been hired, government legislation exists which discourages employers from asking certain questions during the interview process. Technically, employers can ask any questions they want to, they just cannot use certain information in making hiring decisions. In order to avoid potential problems, employers typically avoid certain topics.

Some of these discouraged areas of inquiry include:. Most importantly, notify the Steinbright Career Development Center immediately when you perceive that employer questions were not appropriate. Types of Interviews Types of Interviews Every employer has a preferred style of obtaining the information they need for their hiring decision.

Structured Interview A structured interview is typically formal and organized and may include several interviewers, commonly referred to as a panel interview. Unstructured Interview The unstructured interview is what the name implies.

Stress Interview This style is used primarily by interviewers who are hiring for positions where there is a high level of daily stress in the work environment i.

Behavioral Interview Behavioral interviewing is a widely used method of job interviewing. Behavioral interview questions generally start with any one of the following phrases: Tell me about a time when you Describe a circumstance when you were faced with a problem related to Tell me how you approached a situation where Share with me an instance in which you demonstrated Problem Solving or Case Interview Employers utilize this style of questioning to test a candidate's analytical ability and communication skills.

Panel Interview Employers often like to gather the opinions of several members of their staff prior to deciding which candidate to hire. Illegal Areas of Inquiry While some information can be elicited once you have been hired, government legislation exists which discourages employers from asking certain questions during the interview process.

Some of these discouraged areas of inquiry include: Age Race Religion National origin an employer can, however, ask if you are legally able to work in the U.

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Structured interviews: These are interviews that strictly adhere to the use of an interview protocol to guide the researcher. It is a more rigid interview style, in that only the .

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A qualitative research interview seeks to cover both a factual and a meaning level, though it is usually more difficult to interview on a meaning level. (Kvale,) Interviews are particularly useful for getting the story behind a Types of Interviews.

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Advantages of interviews include possibilities of collecting detailed information about research questions. Moreover, in in this type of primary data collection researcher has direct control over the flow of process and she has a chance to clarify certain issues during the process if needed. Interviews can be structured, semi-structure or unstructured. In this section, we discuss five different types of interviews: Structured Interviews. Semi-Structured Interviews. Unstructured Interviews. Informal Interviews. Focus Groups. There are a number of ways to classify interviews by type.

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Research Methods › Interviews. The Interview Method. Saul McLeod, published Interviews are different from questionnaires as they involve social interaction. Researchers can ask different types of questions which in turn generate different types of data. For example, closed questions provide people with a fixed set of responses Author: Saul Mcleod. Feb 18,  · In this blog post I want to take some time looking at the different types of interviews for collecting data. Every qualitative researcher will at one time or another need to conduct research where they need to interview their research participant(s). In the view of the research (Burnard, Gill.